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Monthly Archives: April 2017

Things You May Want to Consider about Money Management for Students with Credit Card

# Avoid Temptations

If you have a particular weakness, and we all do, just stay away from it. If you love shopping, stay out of the malls. If you’re a tech-head, stick to once a year upgrades. Nobody says avoiding temptation is going to be easy. However, it is a must if you want to save money. When you want to give into your temptation, this is the time to use your “allowance”. Your allowance can be a set amount for ‘special’ items, or just a big jar where you put your loose change at the end of every day.

# Credit Cards

If you have a credit card, use it only for emergency. Although they are really handy, credit cards are dangerous and possibly very damaging to your financial future. Credit cards (and in particular student credit cards) have very high interest rates. If you are only able or willing to make the minimum monthly payments then you will very quickly end up with a HUGE amount of debt because of the interest. The really bad thing is that you will also have to pay interest on the interest you owe. So, credit cards are good in a pinch, but should never be used as an extension of your cash.

# Credit Card Interest

If you have credit cards and your credit is in good standing, you should take the time to call your credit card company, and ask for your interest rate to be lowered. It is just as simple as that. Most people have no idea they can even do this so they never make the call. Just ask the rep for a better rate on your credit card and they will take care of it for you.

# Financial Consulting

Many financial companies, community colleges and even churches offer classes on how to manage money. In some cases the courses are free, but often they cost around $35 to attend: it is money well spent. Another choice you have is consumer-counseling services. This is a great if you are getting into debt trouble. The counselors will work with your creditors to lower your balances, interest rates, and establish workable payment schedule that you can manage.

 

Teenage Finance

The biggest and most neglected step for many families is teaching their teens how to manage their money. Teenage finance is about educating teens on the value of money. Teach them how to save by showing them how to use their primitive form of book-keeping. This can often be incorporated through the child’s upbringing via piggy-banks, savings accounts, and little chores in exchange for money.

Teenage finance is an important part of your personal finance because, too. When your children learn to save and use money wisely, you are subsequently saved from bailing them out of financial troubles in the future.

Personal Ethics and finance go hand-in-hand; if you have a good relationship with yourself, you will be able to save money. You won’t feel the urge to do things that go against your ethics like sign-up for a credit card using someone else’s name.

Personal finance involves taking a few steps toward safe-guarding your money. Your money spent should not exceed your money received. In order to prevent this from happening, you should make a crude balance sheet and use it to record all of your transactions.

Each month write down how much was received and how much was spent. Make a list of all the things the money was spent on, so you can keep track of your money.

You will be amazed at how much we spend on things that are not necessities.

Make a list and stick to it. Always try to get the best deal for your money and remember that cheaper does not necessarily mean lower quality.

After-all it is your money; managing your personal finances should be seen as a mandatory part of making money work for you.

 

Tips to Save on Automobile Gas

The next time you reach for your car keys ask yourself: ‘Do I really need to drive?’ Every trip to the store does not require car keys; you may find that there are ways of getting to your destination that are less expensive or even free:

Walk! If your destination is just a quarter of a mile or so away, walking those few blocks will not only save your gas money it will help you stay in good shape.

Peddle! You may own a bicycle that’s sitting in a corner and not being used; dust it off and use it for those destinations that are just two or three miles away. Don’t worry! You never forget how to ride a bike! If you don’t own a bicycle, consider buying one.

Public transportation! For those trips that are just not practical for walking or peddling, consider your public transportation options.

Ride sharing! There are literally thousands of carpools operating five days a week and saving their members plenty of money on gas and on wear and tear on their cars. Ask around at work, you may be able to find two or three people who live in your general area and who are willing to start a carpool. Also ask at work if the company has considered starting a van pool — they may already have one that you can get in on.

Neighborhood networking! Many times, in suburbs and small communities, neighbors get together for weekly trips to the grocery store or into town for other shopping or supplies — one week one person drives and the next week someone else drives. That type of arrangement also works great for getting the kids to school and home when you live in an area where there is no school bus service.

Telecommuting! More and more people are working for home and, with modern technology, they can even attend virtual meetings right from home. There are thousands of companies across the country that allow telecommuting and, if you can present it as a practical alternative to your management, you may join the ranks of telecommuters — at least some days of the week.

Perhaps you have no choice — there is just no way, other than driving, to get from ‘Point A’ to ‘Point B;’ there are some things you can do to make your driving a money-saving experience.

Moderation! Watch your speed, if you drive at posted speed limits you’ll actually be driving at the most fuel-efficient speeds; if you have cruise control, use it for highway driving. When pulling away from a stop sign or light, don’t ‘floor it;’ jackrabbit starts are a big waste of gas. Jamming on your breaks wastes gas also and, more importantly, if you find yourself constantly hitting the breaks hard you’re driving far too aggressively; there is no need to add medical bills to your gas bills.

Plan ahead! During the morning and afternoon ‘rush hours’ you may find that the shortest route between home and work is also the most congested. Find an alternate route, even if its a little longer, it will get you out of those gas-wasting traffic jams. It also may be possible to have your work schedule changed so that you can miss the heavy traffic on the major highways.

Driving ‘lite’! The lighter your vehicle is, the less gas it will use. Don’t lug around unnecessary weight. Also, use the cars well-designed aerodynamics to your advantage by keeping your windows closed and not having anything strapped to the top of your car.

Keep your car in shape! A well maintained car will burn less gas than one that has been neglected: keep your tires properly inflated; use the proper (manufacturer recommended) oil and gas in your car; change your oil and have tune-ups at regular intervals. If your tires need replacement, look for tires that are rated as LRR (Low Rolling Resistance). Proper tire inflation along with the LRR tires will be your biggest fuel savers.

 

Know How A Millionaire Manages One Dollar

Give a millionaire a dollar and they will do something predictable: They will display the discipline not to spend it. That dollar will be deposited into a savings account where it earns interest income. A millionaire does not spend earned income! They only spend the income from their investments. A millionaire cycles money from a job, overtime pay, bonus, etc., into investment accounts. When you start out, you probably don’t have any investments so how are you going to pay your bills? Reject the saying: “Try to save some money after you pay the bills each month.” This rarely happens and may be too little to add up to much. That saying is psychologically backwards. The new saying that I you want to begin with is: “Don’t invest all of your earned income each month, pay a few bills with it.” Do you see the millionaire difference?

Let’s talk about financial building blocks. Give a millionaire a dollar and they will split it up into the distinct building blocks of a solid financial foundation. Ten-cents of that dollar will be allocated to a permanent investment account that is never spent. This account builds your wealth. As I have said before: “Wealth can only be created and maintained by the amount of money that you receive and do not spend.” Well, this is that account, and you need to increase it by a piece of every dollar that you receive. Another ten-cents will be allocated to a savings account. This is a delayed-spending account for expensive purchases such as vacation, home repairs, or cars.

Millionaires save money to buy something before they purchase it, not afterward on credit where you have to pay interest. The next ten-cents is allocated to wealth education. The economy is always changing and you are ultimately responsible for directing all of your money. The only way to do this wisely is to add to your investment knowledge. Get investing ideas by paying for advisors, books, courses, newsletters, magazines, and newspapers. The three-dimes that were just allocated for different purposes is the wealth formula of millionaires; this is how wealth can be built to last for generations. It is only after these three buckets get their share of the dollar that part of it is allocated for taxes on that dollar. Notice that a millionaire pays the taxman after the important building blocks get their share.

There is no such thing as “income before taxes”. There is a tax liability on all income from whatever source. So a millionaire will have a tax strategy in place to receive that dollar before it is ever deposited at the bank. Millionaires don’t overpay their taxes, they manage tax liabilities because they are your single largest expense (Add up how much you paid for income tax to the IRS, state, city, and property taxes – it is probably a much bigger number than you expect). Some ways to minimize your taxes include setting up a part-time business to create legitimate deductions, buying investments that offer depreciation like real estate and oil, and finding the best CPA to give you advice.

The managing-a-dollar formula that the millionaires follow is: minimize the tax liabilities, allocate parts of it to build your financial foundation, decrease the percentage of earned-income that you spend until it is zero, and forge the discipline to consistently follow this routine. Now, at what age do you wish that you had learned this material? At what age do you think you should start exposing your children to these ideas? The correct answer is: as early as possible (and when they start getting an allowance at the very latest).